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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
president doesn't understand when you invest like that in one company makes a harder for technology generally because other entrepreneurs of the same field their opportunity to get capital. who wants to put money into a solar capital -- company when the government picked one of their choice? excellent question. i wrote the book we're spending about $12 billion per year to make electricity more expensive. that it is 6 billion of tax breaks and direct and chairs. this makes no sense in hers low income americans. we brainwashed children toothache greed it is good to think about green products and jobs that yet to we cannot define what a green job it is. that has five definitions of the green job as a discounted. energy from renewable sources. energy efficiency. energy pollution reduction in removal. natural resource conservation. environmental compliance education and training and public awareness. when i was testifying on capitol hill, they had a paper cup in front of me. most the time it it is just a bottle of water. it said architect of the capital and power to save energy on the ot
a major, new bold investment program, going into a new market, expanding a new technology, ect., you are worried about what the tax rate will be when that's generates cash in nine years. the best thing to do is create a lower rate, an expectation that there's not giant tax increases later. >> i agree with that. i think we should do in, but, a, you know we have the highest statutory right and no higher than average effective rates because we have the narrowest base of owl corporate income in the world. >> yeah. >> one of the reasons we have that system is because people like us argued for many years that the more efficient thing, the more, the better way to encourage investment was not to cut the corporate rate, but to have massively accelerated depreciation, expansion of investment, focusing on incentives rather than cutting the rate overall. i think the intuition is changing, but the way we're going it cut the rate is not by closing loopholes, but come out a painful expansions of the base like getting rid of accelerated depreciation and things which have a value so i think -- >> is
was intended to have a sort of a catalytic effect, a accelerating effect on advent of advanced technologies vehicle. that is why it was called the advanced technology vehicle manufacturing program. it was completely separate from the bailout and all other things. unfortunately it was coincident in time. so a lot of people got confused with that. melissa: could you pay it back tomorrow and stop the criminal -- criticism? >> in fact we're paying the loan back in advance. there is schedule repayment, we've been paying interest for about a year. we've been paying the principal payments in advance. and we absolutely are committed to repaying that loan early. so we will do that. melissa: taxpayers will be thrilled to hear that. >> absolutely. melissa: another sticking point buyers get that $7500 credit. in my mind giving somebody food stamps to buy lobster. why would you give somedy credit to go out to buy $100,000 car? how do you respond to that? >> first of all theodel s starts at $57,000. melissa: still lobster. still lobster. >> maybe shrimp or something. melissa: okay. >> but, the goal of te
to the nasdaq, she is following the big movers. >> technology a sore spot for the markets now the s and p tech index trading in correction territory, microsoft down on the departure of the windows division head. management shakeups the street likes, this one they clearly don't a quick check on social media stocks, facebook shares under a little bit of pressure as the street braces for a possible postlockup selling, the biggest lockup since facebook went public. roughly 800 million shares, sue, back to you. >> thank you very much, seem ma. to the bond market now, rick santelli is tracking the action for us at the cme. how are yields doing today, ricky? >> still continues to be a one-way market. the only thing we a by how big of a one-way street is it on? today, only a couple of basis points. look at a chart starting august 1st most important feature, close to a two-month low in yields on the ten yours as well as the 30 as well as the bond. if we look at foreign exchange, very important, see october 1st dollar index, hey what is going on? dollar index is doing well. things really be that bad? ho
interesting. >> a lot of western technology firms build for instance disk drives in thailand. when thai experienced severe flooding those western companies got hit. what is attractive about thailand for long-term investors? >> it's mainly political to begin with. as you know they went through a lot of political turmoil. you had the red shirts, the yellow shirts, fighting on the streets of bangkok and so forth but they have a fufl foundation for political stability which is very good. and also they have a very diversified economy. >> we'll continue talking with mark mobius tomorrow, china's communist party selects a new set of leaders this week. we will talk about how this change in power could impact china's economic relationship with america, and american investors. >> reporter: i'm sylvia hall in washington- still ahead, u.s. borrowers owe more than $1 trillion in student loan debt. so could helping them pay it down be a $1 trillion industry? i'll introduce you to some entrepreneurs who think so. >> susie: besides the fiscal cliff, investors and traders on wall street were talking abo
and technology section security and privacy in information law provision. closest to me we have jason chipman. he was the department of justice to deputy attorney general counsel. prior to that reserve and national security division at doj were his work focused on cyberoperations and national security council issues. i would like to start this discussion by asking elisabeth preston to come and give her remarks. thank you very much. >> good morning. my role will be to provide a little bit of context. i am going to talk a little bit about terminology to make sure that we are on the same page about the terminology and i will give you a bit of a chronology for the types of events that we have seen over the past 10, 12, 14 years -- something like that -- to give you some context. my colleagues, when we discuss the application of law and the sorts of context, we can work with any context we are using. this is a really interesting topic. it is not only topical, but it is on the minds of the most important government officials including at the highest level and so on. but what if you're just a few commen
rates and rigs. this technology is being deployed in such a wide area and so rapidly and with constantly changing technology that the issue for natural gas at this moment in terms of price isn't the depletion rate. it's the huge backlog of wells that have been drilled that haven't been connected to transportation networks to move it from the well head to the markets. so you have a lot of gas sitting there just waiting for the tap to be turned on and that will continue to happen because this is something that is changing the u.s. energy market and is something that at these prices is still profitable for the companies. >> before we let you go, what do you think they are saying in the halls of opec today about this report? >> i don't think halls of opec are that worried. china and the emerging market demand is not going to go away. it may not accelerate as quickly as some people had predicted. certainly the destination for oil from the middle east increasingly is going to be asia. it already has been. we are already looking at perhaps in the next five years according to this report today n
will take money from the airline industry that would otherwise be invested in nextgen technologies and the purchase of new aircraft, two proven methods for improving environmental performance and for reducing emissions. airlines for america and air transport trade association testified before our aviation subcommittee last year that the extraction of capital from the aviation system as enadviceaged under the e.u.'s emission trading scheme could threaten over 78,000 american jobs. this is unacceptable. but despite serious legal issues and ons -- objections by the international community, the european union is pressing ahead with its plans. in september, 2012, 21 countries, including the united states, signed a joint declaration against the e.u. emissions trading scheme in new delhi, india. the last year there have been several other multinational meetings of countries who oppose the scheme, including meetings that took place in russia and the united states. the bill before us directs the secretary of transportation to prohibit u.s. aircraft operators from participating in this illeg
top technology companies, are asking us to preserve education and r&d, which is the bedrock of innovation and competitiveness. and this week, even the u.s. chamber of commerce said it was opened to a compromise that included revenue. these are the constructive voices i hope my colleagues listen to as we approach negotiations on the fiscal cliff. politics is the art of compromise, and working together we can reduce our nation's deficit and preserve strategic investments in those programs that fuel economic growth and competitiveness. even in the midst of the civil war, president lincoln and the 38th congress authorized the transcontinental railroad, the homestead act and the land grant college and university system. they understood we had to invest in the future while also dealing with the crisis of the present. no doubt we all have something to lose if we do not succeed. so perhaps by each of us giving a little we can revive this economic recovery, restore faith in our ability to govern responsible low and deliver on that mandate we just got last week from the voters. i yiel
have the best technology. they have to build up the kind of emotional appeal so people are willing to go out there and spend their time and resources and provide their talents because they believe in someone and what they are offering. we are hopeful that many people that helped us this time will end up running for office themselves, are leading nonprofit, or playing enormously valuable roles in their community. again, i think the only reason all this happened on the ground, we have remarkable staff and the campaign they put together is the best in history. the reason those people got involved is because they believed in barack obama. it was the relationship between them and our candidate. >> one last thing, we never thought of you guys as rooters. >> i think that is it. thank you all for joining us. this is our last conference call for the campaign. it has been a pleasure talking with you often, and i am sure we will have an opportunity to work together again. thanks. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >
, whether that was registration forms or getting people their checklist or whatever technology they were using, that made him a difference because they could talk to more people. these are hundreds of thousands of door knobs and phone calls they were able to do. so that's a big thing. then when you look at the exit polls, there's a couple things beyond the changing face of the nation, a changing attitude of the nation. when you think about what happened on election night, wisconsin elected the nation's first open lesbian senator to gay marriage approved in four states. marijuana would be legal in colorado. this is a country where people are becoming more socially liberal, while the republicans are doing this soul-searching between what type of social policies they want to promote. that trip to a lot of senate candidates. we will talk more about that i'm sure. and so this is where young voters are a big part of this demographic key as well. they actually turned out in bigger numbers in 2012 than he did in 2008 despite her not being an overall. the democrats talked a lot in 2008 about want
of infringing on its technology. and citigroup will pay 15.5 million each to former ceo vehicle recomme vikram pandit reflectinging t t progress the coma. >> some of it was money that it already -- i thought the number was 6.6 smld what they actually gave him as an incentive fee. >> for leaving? >> well, that's the irony of it. >> going quietly maybe. >> he didn't go that quietly actually. he said it was his choice. he blamed everybody else. >> that's all boiler plate, isn't it? >> i guess so. >> so the jacket was deliberate. >> honestly i said to myself i don't have a pin today and maybe i will just not wear the jacket as a wave rising above. >> interesting. >> mac even came over to hand me the jacket. >> i saw. >> deliberate. >> goldman sachs is in settlement talks over an $8.3 billion position that one of the traders had concealed five years ago. a settlement is expected in coming weeks. and i probably -- do i look different today? no? not really? >> did you get a haircut? >> no. i got power. last night. >> you got power. >> last night. >> like 11:00 last night? >> 11:00. >> so almost two f
they be studying? >> um, i think a lot of people talk about what they call s.t.e.m., science, technology, something and math. >> engineering. >> engineering and math, right. [laughter] you know, i do think, look, i'm all for -- you know, i have a son who's majoring in classics. i'm all for studying all these interesting things. but i do think that having those kinds of skills are what -- it's part of when you do look at the countries that we worry about competing with us, a lot of their focus is on studying those kinds of things that actually have, you know, have real world usefulness in the economy. and germany for a long time, i've spent a reasonable amount of time in germany, has emphasized engineering and technical backgrounds, and certainly china is going it, and i'm all for -- as i said, i'm all for having historians and even economists. [laughter] economists are very important. but, or money managers. but i do think that having those kinds of, having a strong base of people with those kinds of skills is a great, would be a great thing. >> so i think that the most important point is education
jet that industry experts say may have been developed with stolen u.s. technology. the chinese j. 31 stealth fighter has an air intake and wing dimension that is suspiciously similar to the american f-35 and a silhouette similar to lockheed martin's raptor. u.s. navy officials confirm a russian nuclear powered attack submarine was detected 300 miles off the east coast of the united states in late october. russia's navy commander announced earlier this year that on june 1, russian nuclear powered subs would return to patrolling the world's oceans as they did during soviet times. at the pentagon, jennifer griffin, fox news. >> heather: coming up, new insight into the 2012 election. polling showing the biggest gender gap in recorded history is this part of a new trend? if so, what will it mean for future elections? and then fed up. we'll talk with one county leader who is calling on the feds to get involved with power restoration in his community as customer frustration grows. >> they don't answer it. i call lipa, they say, we can't do anything for you. you have to get an inspector. can
. american technology, which opens up another topic of discussion, but a lot of it -- the concept is created in the u.s. and then it is put together there. our economies are intertwined. i think that on the question, globalization and all its implications are huge part of the political debate in this country. over jobs, over national security. this is the new reality. you cannot put nafta or globalization or the internet back in a box. it was not china, it would be india and countries in africa. it already is making products that are either american in concept or are just completely international products. host: scott, let me add this to the mix -- the reporter notes that this will presumably not be much appreciated by beijing. guest: burma is a place that china perceives as in its sphere of influence. particularly as a place to get the resources it needs. timber along the borders, oil. there has been a backlash inside burma which is why we saw political reform their last year which is the reason the president is going, against china. in the way it treats burma as it basically its backyard f
much rather power this economy with the energy technologies that won't be viable for 30, 40 years from now as opposed to driving the economy with what's viable today. >> phil, this analysis said we could be oil exporters within the next 20 years or some what kind of an impact would that have on our economy as a whole? >> well i think it is going to give us a new form of income. it will lower our trade deficit. we were always concerned about, you know, sending all our money to china for goods and the trade deficit with china, it is not fair. guess what? we're going to be in a distinct advantage over china, not only from a trade standpoint because we're going to be able to provide them with energy they need but also because we're going to be able to attract manufacturing jobs here to the united states. why? because we're going to have the reliable, low-priced energy source for years to come. that's going to bring manufacturing back to the u.s. that will bring factories and jobs. this is historic. i'm euphoric. i've seen it coming for some time. i'm glad the international energy agency is
of the art oil spill prevention and response technologies, education research and training. and more than $1 billion will go to the united states coast guard trust fund to be available for clean up and coffer sation for those affected by oil spills in the gulf and throughout the united states. now as part of its guilty plea b.p. will retain a monitor for four years who will oversee safety and maintenance in regard to drilling in the gulf as well as an independent auditor who will conduct annual reviews to enshurep compliance with the terms of this agreement. the company will hire an ethics monitor to improve it's its conduct and foster robust cooperation with the government. now there can be no question that this historic announcement is a critical step forward and under scores the justice determination to stand with gulf coast communities. in february the settlement tote ling $90 million related to the company's clean water act liability for the deep water horizon disaster. and approximately $45 million of this total will go directly to the gulf in the form of penalties. but our work is far
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)